Design and Technology at Pittington

Spring Term

At Pittington Primary School we provide many opportunities for our children to learn and practise design & technology (DT) skills.  As part of the National Curriculum we have four strands for DT which are to design, make, evaluate and have technical knowledge through which our children can critique, evaluate and test their design ideas and the products made by their peers.

There is also a cooking and nutrition component through which our children understand the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet, prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques and understand seasonality, know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed

To help with their learning, Pittington Primary links this strand of the DT curriculum with what they learn within:

Science - Properties and changes of materials

Science - Animals, including humans

PSHE (personal, social, health and economic) - Health and Well Being

Early Years – Nursery and Reception

During this term packaging and wrapping design was investigated with a focus on using of joining techniques for how materials are tied, glued, stuck and boxed things.  Experimentation and malleability was explored using gloop, clay, and when making play dough from raw ingredients.  There has been more design used before building in construction areas and design using Lego have been more detailed.  Children have become more expressive when explaining to their peers for how they have created their models. 

The source of food from farm to fork has been researched and similarities or differences between seeds and the end product have been investigated. 

With a focus on sustainability, crop waste and corn husk reuse and recycling was explored. 

Key Stage 1 – Year One and Year Two

Children in years one and two enjoy the practical aspects of learning DT by having termly opportunities for creative and practical activities that link with their local community such as their home, our school garden, playground and field, regional industry and the global environment.

Moving mechanisms was a focus and skills for how to cut a square from the centre of a piece of card were practised, as was the use of a sharp pencil and Blu Tack for putting a hole in card.  Knowledge of wheel, slider and lever was explored to make the moving mechanism scenes more interactive. 

Structures was explored with the investigation of a tipi, wigwam and treehouse design.  Consideration was given for how structures become  strong so that they do not bend, break, shatter or deform when force is applied and stability so they don’t topple.  Prior to the design was exploration with gumdrop structures to explore the rigidity of triangular building structures like bridges.  Finally, a design and make project was to make miniature tipis from items using sticks, wool, fabric, feathers and beads, concluding with an evaluation of their designs against a set of criteria. 

Lower Key Stage 2 – Year Three and Year Four

With the skills practised, their improved knowledge and successes at understanding our children continue to design and make products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups and contribute by solving a challenge.

Almost all children enjoy drawing and at our school there are many opportunities within DT to put pencil to paper and play with their design ideas using annotated sketches, cross-sectional drawings and exploded diagrams.

Children completed the first four components of the design process using the corridor display as a reminder.  Their evolving design ideas were explored with cardboard prototypes.  Evaluations provided opportunities for children to recognise that they may have over complicated the design and several realised they had deviated from the design brief to design a product for the needs of a customer. 

Seasonal availability of foods from the UK compared with Greece was also explored.

Children also had opportunities to make string telephones, researched

beam, suspension, arch and cantilever bridges, constructed small scale bridges and tested them using bridge kits with a follow on activity to construct bridges using rolled newspaper beams. 

Upper Key Stage 2 – Year Five and Year Six

As their manual dexterity improves they select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment when cutting, shaping, joining and finishing to ensure that their products are functional and aesthetically pleasing.

As their practical skills, knowledge of design and understanding of material properties develop children at our school work with more complex structures considering how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce then or incorporate gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages.  After evaluate the prototypes of products they have made, children can begin to incorporate what they now from science and use circuits, switches, bulbs, buzzers or motors.

Thanks to the support from local residents and allotment holders, the seasonality and growing of fruits and vegetables in our local community was explored.  Explanations to peers of produce grown on local farms included cooking and tasting of beetroot prepared three different ways.  In addition there has been the preparation and cooking of sweet potatoes, beetroot and parsnips.  Linked with food was the design and packaging of salad served in a ‘pop up kitchen’.  

At the end of the Autumn Term children completed an electrical decoration which included an element of control.  They applied dimmer switches which they made using graphite to control the brightness of the lights or the speed of a motor. 

Children investigated gears and pulleys in relation to making working models of fairground rides based upon the novel being studied in class.

Enrichment opportunities

Children within each key stage periodically have opportunities to experience visiting designers, engineers or visit exhibitions that give hands on opportunities that show how DT is used within business and industries of our region.  Other opportunities include designing products that have been sent away and manufactured and then used in school, or entering competitions and STEM events at Beamish Open Air museum.

Autumn Term

At Pittington Primary School we provide many opportunities for our children to learn and practise design & technology (DT) skills.  As part of the National Curriculum we have four strands for DT which are to design, make, evaluate and have technical knowledge through which our children can critique, evaluate and test their design ideas and the products made by their peers.

 

There is also a cooking and nutrition component through which our children understand the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet, prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques and understand seasonality, know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed.

 

To help with their learning Pittington Primary links this strand of the DT curriculum with what they learn within:

Science - Properties and changes of materials

Science - Animals, including humans

PSHE (personal, social, health and economic) - Health and Well Being

Early Years and Key Stage 1

Children in years one and two enjoy the practical aspects of learning DT by having termly opportunities for creative and practical activities that link with their local community such as their home, our school garden, playground and field, regional industry and the global environment.

Key Stage 2

With the skills practised, their improved knowledge and successes at understanding our children continue to design and make products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups and contribute by solving a challenge.

Almost all children enjoy drawing and at our school there are many opportunities within DT to put pencil to paper and play with their design ideas using annotated sketches, cross-sectional drawings and exploded diagrams.

 

As their manual dexterity improves they select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment when cutting, shaping, joining and finishing to ensure that their products are functional and aesthetically pleasing.

As their practical skills, knowledge of design and understanding of material properties develop children at our school work with more complex structures considering how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce then or incorporate gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages.  After evaluate the prototypes of products they have made, children can begin to incorporate what they now from science and use circuits, switches, bulbs, buzzers or motors.

Enrichment opportunities

Children within each key stage periodically have opportunities to experience visiting designers, engineers or visit exhibitions that give hands on opportunities that show how DT is used within business and industries of our region.  Other opportunities include designing products that have been sent away and manufactured and then used in school, or entering competitions and STEM events at Beamish Open Air museum.