Pittington Primary School

Please bear with us as we are currently redeveloping our website.

01913 720314 Fax: 01913 720314

pittington@durhamlearning.net

Pittington Primary School | Hallgarth Lane, Durham, County Durham DH6 1AF

Design and Technology at Pittington

Spring Term 2020 

 Before the premature end of this Spring term, children had learnt and practised more of the DT skills for this academic year and continued to combine their DT skills with science and other curriculum subjects.  The children had succeeded with many aspects of developing their skills to design, make, evaluate and test their designed products.  Healthy and varied food was prepared and cooked using a range of techniques.  Next term we will hopefully be able to use our new portable induction hob. 

Early Years – Nursery and Reception 

The adult explains: 

In Nursery we have been looking at the traditional tale ‘The Three Billy Goats Gruff’.  The children became interested in constructing bridges, so we started to look at different bridges in the North East area and talked about what and who would use them, for example cars, trains, people.  We also looked at the different ways in which they were designed and constructed and how some move. The children planned, designed and constructed bridges both inside and outside of Nursery using wooden blocks, tyres, crates and cardboard. We tested the strength of our bridges using toy cars during a group session and talked about which design we thought was best and why.  

Following a child’s personal interestwe decided to look at volcanoes.  We talked about what they are and the countries where they are found.  We then decided to make our own volcano using papier-mâché We used a cone to make the basic shape of the volcano and then added layers of newspaper and glue until we had a good shape.  Next we decided to paint the volcano and then made it erupt. It was great fun and quite challenging to get the shape and design correct.  The children became inspired by this learning and made their own volcanoes independently using a range of materials such as construction blocks, cardboard and play dough.

The children in year 1 had a visit from a special guest called Sarah who came to teach them about healthy eating and cooking.  She helped the children to make 3 delicious dishes: 

Peaches, banana and mango fruit smoothie (followed by raspberries in the second smoothie) 

Five Chinese spice vegetable stir fry with honey and soy sauce 

Mackerel, crème fraîche , lemon juice and parsley on crackers 

Sarah was fantastic and encouraged the children to be ‘hands on’.  They took part in stirring, peeling, pouring and tasting!  Some children were extremely excited about tasting something new while others were a little cautious. Everyone had a chance to try the food they wanted to.  The children really enjoyed watching the process of preparing and cooking food, as well as discussing the ingredients.  We had a great time learning about healthy dishes. 

Key Stage 1 – Year One and Year Two 

During this shortened Spring term, children in key stage one continued to enjoy the practical aspects of learning DT with a range of creative and practical activities linked with our village and school community. 

The children explored different kinds of mechanisms, such as sliders and levers. To explore and promote the children’s learning in Design and Technology skills we used some of their favourite traditional stories and animals to create interactive resources. From a running gingerbread man to a dinosaur hatching thy used the knowledge they learnt about mechanisms to create moving figures and scenes. We then worked together and discussed the positives and negatives of what we had made and whether there could be a way to improve them for the user. We had lots of fun creating these and enjoyed using them during our stories. 

In year 2 this term we have been designing and building a hedgehog house. We researched Hedgehogs and found out that there are less than a million left in the UK, compared to over 30 million in the 1950’s therefore, we wanted to do something to help. We learnt about Hedgehogs and discussed what kind of materials would be best to create a warm inviting home for a Hedgehog.  

We designed our house and thought about the structure and how we could make it as robust as possible. We discussed our ideas through drawing and talking and presented them to the class. We then went on to build our Hedgehog house out of wood, bricks, leaves, strong glue and duck tape. We each had our own individual task when building the structure and we all worked well as a team. Afterwards we evaluated our hedgehog home and thought about ways in which we could improve it. Some of the suggestions were to make a smaller tunnel entrance so the Hedgehog would feel safer.  

We are looking forward to revisiting our Hedgehog home to make improvements to it in time for Autumn and Winter.. just incase a Hedgehog may need a home! 

Lower Key Stage 2 – Year Three and Year Four 

With the skills practised, their improved knowledge and successes at understanding our children continue to design and make products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups and contribute by solving a challenge. 

Almost all children enjoy drawing and at our school there are many opportunities within DT to put pencil to paper and play with their design ideas using annotated sketches, cross-sectional drawings and exploded diagrams.  Children completed the first four components of the design process using the classroom display as a reminder.

Year 4 focused on healthy and balanced foods and explored the challenge of designing a balanced sandwich for a Viking to take upon an expedition.  This has included being able to explore and evaluate existing products. The children looked closely at what each food group provides for the body. They also looked at how produced foods such as bread are made.   

Upper Key Stage 2 – Year Five and Year Six 

As their manual dexterity improves they select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment when cutting, shaping, joining and finishing to ensure that their products are functional and aesthetically pleasing. 

As their practical skills, knowledge of design and understanding of material properties develop children at our school work with more complex structures considering how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce then or incorporate gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages.  After evaluating the prototypes of product they made, children begin to incorporate what they know from science and use circuits, switches, bulbs, buzzers or motors. 

Our food technology work this term allowed the year 5 children to explore seasonality and fruits and vegetables that are imported and exported from the UK. The teacher explains: 

We researched how professional chefs felt about the issue and listened to debates around the subject. We then set to work on preparing seasonal vegetables in different ways and cooking them in class together. We used, beetroot, swede and potatoes and experimented with grating, peeling, slicing and dicing in preparation. We then explored roasting, boiling, frying and steaming during work on cooking techniques. Everyone enjoyed the tasting part in each session and some children faced their fears and tried something new.  

Our next step was to use these skills to put together a healthy snack to take with us to the dance festival. We talked about the design brief including costings and packaging. If we manage to get back before the end of term it would be great to finish the project we started. 

Year 6 have been exploring Easter lights in DT.  Although they didn’t get the opportunity to make them due to the school closure, the children started by conducting some market research and sketched a plan for our designs.   

Enrichment opportunities 

Children within each key stage periodically have opportunities to experience visiting designers, engineers or visit exhibitions that give hands on opportunities that show how DT is used within business and industries of our region.  Other opportunities include designing products that have been sent away and manufactured and then used in school or entering competitions and STEM events at Beamish Open Air museum. 

Autumn Term

At Pittington Primary School we provide many opportunities for our children to learn and practise design & technology (DT) skills.  As part of the National Curriculum we have four strands for DT which are to design, make, evaluate and have technical knowledge through which our children can critique, evaluate and test their design ideas and the products made by their peers.

There is also a cooking and nutrition component through which our children understand the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet, prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques and understand seasonality, know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed

To help with their learning Pittington Primary links this strand of the DT curriculum with what they learn within:

Science - Properties and changes of materials

Science - Animals, including humans

PSHE (personal, social, health and economic) - Health and Well Being

Early Years

During Autumn term children tried various techniques in the area of ‘Expressive arts and design’.  They explored different tools and how they can be used for a purpose.

Many of the children tried sewing for the first time, learning how to use a needle effectively.

Children explored how to use various tools and techniques at our woodwork bench.

The children had been fishing with fishing rods in the classroom so adults modelled how to make fish using paper and paper clips.  Designs were tested in the school pond.  Two of our fish sank so we are looking forward to seeing some rainbow fish in the summer if they have babies!

Children have also been interested in designing and constructing towns and cities this term.  They designed maps of towns and also looked at the features of some of the buildings.  These constructions are Tower Bridge and Big Ben from London.

There has been lots of fun experimenting with a variety of different methods to create wonderful masterpieces such as sunglasses and superheroes.  The children have been exploring the variety of ways to join different media together such as using masking tape, glue, staples, paperclips and bending pipe-cleaners!

The children have also been designing and building on larger scales too such as houses outdoors and with indoor construction equipment.  The children have been revisiting their work and making additions to enhance their designs.

Finally, they put all our skills together to make a giant sized The Very Hungry Caterpillar for Pittington Lumiere!

Key Stage 1

Children in years one and two enjoy the practical aspects of learning DT by having termly opportunities for creative and practical activities that link with their local community such as their home, our school garden, playground and field, regional industry and the global environment.

Children have been exploring how to build structures.  Linked to their topic fire and ice, they learnt about The Great Fire of London and wanted to make their very own Tudor houses.  They looked at how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable.  The children discussed ideas through talking and drawing, and shared ideas with each other.  They agreed together on the best materials to use for the Tudor houses and were all very happy with the results.

Key Stage 2

With the skills practised, their improved knowledge and successes at understanding our children continue to design and make products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups and contribute by solving a challenge.

Almost all children enjoy drawing and at our school there are many opportunities within DT to put pencil to paper and play with their design ideas using annotated sketches, cross-sectional drawings and exploded diagrams.

As their manual dexterity improves they select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment when cutting, shaping, joining and finishing to ensure that their products are functional and aesthetically pleasing.

As their practical skills, knowledge of design and understanding of material properties develop children at our school work with more complex structures considering how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce then or incorporate gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages.  After evaluate the prototypes of products they have made, children can begin to incorporate what they now from science and use circuits, switches, bulbs, buzzers or motors.

Enrichment opportunities

Children within each key stage periodically have opportunities to experience visiting designers, engineers or visit exhibitions that give hands on opportunities that show how DT is used within business and industries of our region.  Other opportunities include designing products that have been sent away and manufactured and then used in school, or entering competitions and STEM events at Beamish Open Air museum.

Summer Term

By the end of this summer term, children will have learnt and practised all the DT skills for this academic year.  The children have succeeded with many aspects of developing their skills to design, make, evaluate and test their designed products.  Healthy and varied food has been prepared and cooked using a range of techniques.

They have continued to combine their DT skills with science and other curriculum subjects.

Early Years – Nursery and Reception

Since Easter, the children have used the hammer and nails to make a car in their outside woodwork area.  In this area, one young child used the nails, hammers and saws to make… well what else… a minimising tool!  The other day one of the children used the different materials in the construction area to make a star house.

 

Key Stage 1 – Year One and Year Two

During this summer term, children in key stage one have continued to enjoy the practical aspects of learning DT with a range of creative and practical activities linked with our village and school community.

This summer term we have been focussing on testing and evaluating products, product design and the design process.  Our aim was to test and evaluate a range of bubble baths for Mr. Stink and give him a recommendation of which we liked the most from our rigorous testing criteria.  We then went on to discuss the ideas behind designing each one asking questions like:  Who is this product aimed at? How do you know? What colours, font, names have been used? Why is it that shape?   The class also designed their own bubble baths with their age range in mind.

 

Lower Key Stage 2 – Year Three and Year Four

Since the end of April, our lower key stage two children applied their knowledge with much greater focus on them being fit for purpose and designed for the needs of the customer.

With greater understanding of skills learnt from the art and craft curriculum, our children developed the skills with using annotated sketches, cross-sectional drawings and exploded diagrams.

Children have been making papier-mâché mini-beasts as part of our animal habitats topic.   

 

Upper Key Stage 2 – Year Five and Year Six

As the end of the academic year approaches, children in upper key stage two demonstrate with more control their dexterity at using a wider range of tools for cutting, shaping, joining and finishing to ensure that their products are functional and aesthetically pleasing, as is required by their customer.  This was evident when children from UKS2 carried out market research with children from nursery.

 

Spring Term

At Pittington Primary School we provide many opportunities for our children to learn and practise design & technology (DT) skills.  As part of the National Curriculum we have four strands for DT which are to design, make, evaluate and have technical knowledge through which our children can critique, evaluate and test their design ideas and the products made by their peers.

There is also a cooking and nutrition component through which our children understand the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet, prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques and understand seasonality, know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed

To help with their learning, Pittington Primary links this strand of the DT curriculum with what they learn within:

Science - Properties and changes of materials

Science - Animals, including humans

PSHE (personal, social, health and economic) - Health and Well Being

Early Years – Nursery and Reception

During this term packaging and wrapping design was investigated with a focus on using of joining techniques for how materials are tied, glued, stuck and boxed things.  Experimentation and malleability was explored using gloop, clay, and when making play dough from raw ingredients.  There has been more design used before building in construction areas and design using Lego have been more detailed.  Children have become more expressive when explaining to their peers for how they have created their models. 

The source of food from farm to fork has been researched and similarities or differences between seeds and the end product have been investigated. 

With a focus on sustainability, crop waste and corn husk reuse and recycling was explored. 

Key Stage 1 – Year One and Year Two

Children in years one and two enjoy the practical aspects of learning DT by having termly opportunities for creative and practical activities that link with their local community such as their home, our school garden, playground and field, regional industry and the global environment.

Moving mechanisms was a focus and skills for how to cut a square from the centre of a piece of card were practised, as was the use of a sharp pencil and Blu Tack for putting a hole in card.  Knowledge of wheel, slider and lever was explored to make the moving mechanism scenes more interactive. 

Structures was explored with the investigation of a tipi, wigwam and treehouse design.  Consideration was given for how structures become  strong so that they do not bend, break, shatter or deform when force is applied and stability so they don’t topple.  Prior to the design was exploration with gumdrop structures to explore the rigidity of triangular building structures like bridges.  Finally, a design and make project was to make miniature tipis from items using sticks, wool, fabric, feathers and beads, concluding with an evaluation of their designs against a set of criteria. 

Lower Key Stage 2 – Year Three and Year Four

With the skills practised, their improved knowledge and successes at understanding our children continue to design and make products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups and contribute by solving a challenge.

Almost all children enjoy drawing and at our school there are many opportunities within DT to put pencil to paper and play with their design ideas using annotated sketches, cross-sectional drawings and exploded diagrams.

Children completed the first four components of the design process using the corridor display as a reminder.  Their evolving design ideas were explored with cardboard prototypes.  Evaluations provided opportunities for children to recognise that they may have over complicated the design and several realised they had deviated from the design brief to design a product for the needs of a customer. 

Seasonal availability of foods from the UK compared with Greece was also explored.

Children also had opportunities to make string telephones, researched

beam, suspension, arch and cantilever bridges, constructed small scale bridges and tested them using bridge kits with a follow on activity to construct bridges using rolled newspaper beams. 

Upper Key Stage 2 – Year Five and Year Six

As their manual dexterity improves they select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment when cutting, shaping, joining and finishing to ensure that their products are functional and aesthetically pleasing.

As their practical skills, knowledge of design and understanding of material properties develop children at our school work with more complex structures considering how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce then or incorporate gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages.  After evaluate the prototypes of products they have made, children can begin to incorporate what they now from science and use circuits, switches, bulbs, buzzers or motors.

Thanks to the support from local residents and allotment holders, the seasonality and growing of fruits and vegetables in our local community was explored.  Explanations to peers of produce grown on local farms included cooking and tasting of beetroot prepared three different ways.  In addition there has been the preparation and cooking of sweet potatoes, beetroot and parsnips.  Linked with food was the design and packaging of salad served in a ‘pop up kitchen’.  

At the end of the Autumn Term children completed an electrical decoration which included an element of control.  They applied dimmer switches which they made using graphite to control the brightness of the lights or the speed of a motor. 

Children investigated gears and pulleys in relation to making working models of fairground rides based upon the novel being studied in class.

Enrichment opportunities

Children within each key stage periodically have opportunities to experience visiting designers, engineers or visit exhibitions that give hands on opportunities that show how DT is used within business and industries of our region.  Other opportunities include designing products that have been sent away and manufactured and then used in school, or entering competitions and STEM events at Beamish Open Air museum.

Autumn Term

At Pittington Primary School we provide many opportunities for our children to learn and practise design & technology (DT) skills.  As part of the National Curriculum we have four strands for DT which are to design, make, evaluate and have technical knowledge through which our children can critique, evaluate and test their design ideas and the products made by their peers.

 

There is also a cooking and nutrition component through which our children understand the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet, prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques and understand seasonality, know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed.

 

To help with their learning Pittington Primary links this strand of the DT curriculum with what they learn within:

Science - Properties and changes of materials

Science - Animals, including humans

PSHE (personal, social, health and economic) - Health and Well Being

Early Years and Key Stage 1

Children in years one and two enjoy the practical aspects of learning DT by having termly opportunities for creative and practical activities that link with their local community such as their home, our school garden, playground and field, regional industry and the global environment.

Key Stage 2

With the skills practised, their improved knowledge and successes at understanding our children continue to design and make products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups and contribute by solving a challenge.

Almost all children enjoy drawing and at our school there are many opportunities within DT to put pencil to paper and play with their design ideas using annotated sketches, cross-sectional drawings and exploded diagrams.

 

As their manual dexterity improves they select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment when cutting, shaping, joining and finishing to ensure that their products are functional and aesthetically pleasing.

As their practical skills, knowledge of design and understanding of material properties develop children at our school work with more complex structures considering how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce then or incorporate gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages.  After evaluate the prototypes of products they have made, children can begin to incorporate what they now from science and use circuits, switches, bulbs, buzzers or motors.

Enrichment opportunities

Children within each key stage periodically have opportunities to experience visiting designers, engineers or visit exhibitions that give hands on opportunities that show how DT is used within business and industries of our region.  Other opportunities include designing products that have been sent away and manufactured and then used in school, or entering competitions and STEM events at Beamish Open Air museum.